Raj K. Syal, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.    |    Jenna A. Everson, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.    |    Holly Westmoreland, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.   

Diabetes

A simple explanation is that people with diabetes have elevated glucose levels, also called high blood sugar. High blood sugar can cause a wide range of issues, because it can affect many organs and systems in the body. Because it can affect so many things, it is important to stay current with your physician regarding diabetes and any symptoms you may be having. Even if you have had diabetes for years, knowledge becomes available quickly in our time and treatment options and goals may change year-to-year as a result.

Our goal in caring for you and your baby is to oversee the progress of your pregnancy while taking into account your diabetes and its effects on you both. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, plan on seeing us more often in our office to insure the well-being of your pregnancy, but know that appointments with us to not mean that you can skip appointments with your other physicians that help to manage your diabetes.

Please continue to see your endocrinologist or family physician that helps you manage your diabetes and keep us informed of any treatment plan changes that may occur — especially changes in medication from oral to injection — as these changes can affect your developing fetus. We also request contact information for this physician so that we can be in contact and work as a team to manage your health during this important and exciting time in your life.

Of course, great information exists about the care of women with diabetes during pregnancy. You can visit the American Diabetes Association, or diabetes online communities like Diabetes Daily, online. This book, Balancing Pregnancy with Pre-Existing Diabetes, by Cheryl Alkon, is a must read for any woman with pre-existing diabetes who is pregnant or thinking about conceiving.